Posts tagged with: "canine searches"
Results 1 - 9 of 9
Sorted by Relevance | Sort by Date
RSS Subscribe: 20 results | 100 results
27 Mar 2013, 4:34 am by davidharrisauthor
On November 5, I posted here about Florida v. Jardines, in which the U.S. Supreme Court would decide this question: when a police officer takes a dog trained to sniff for drugs onto the porch of a home to sniff the air coming from under the door of a house, does this action constitute a search under the Fourth Amendment?  If the answer was yes, this would mean that police would need a warrant from a court before bringing the dog up to the door.  In past cases, the Court had given police… [read post]
27 Mar 2013, 4:34 am by davidharrisauthor
On November 5, I posted here about Florida v. Jardines, in which the U.S. Supreme Court would decide this question: when a police officer takes a dog trained to sniff for drugs onto the porch of a home to sniff the air coming from under the door of a house, does this action constitute a search under the Fourth Amendment?  If the answer was yes, this would mean that police would need a warrant from a court before bringing the dog up to the door.  In past cases, the Court had given police… [read post]
5 Nov 2012, 11:25 am by davidharrisauthor
Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court held arguments on cases involving police use of dog detection dogs, and the ability of citizens to sue when they think their conversations have been monitored under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.  These are important matters, with important long-term implications for the privacy of all Americans. I had the chance to discuss these cases on Pittsburgh Public Radio’s Essential Pittsburgh talk show.  To hear the complete audio file, click here. In the… [read post]
26 Mar 2013, 8:40 am by Jeff Welty
Today, most Supreme Court watchers are focused on the oral argument in the same-sex marriage cases. But the Court also released an important opinion in Florida v. Jardines, ruling that an officer conducts a Fourth Amendment search when he brings a drug dog onto the porch of a house to sniff the front door. Jardines [...] [read post]
20 May 2011, 7:06 pm
On April 21, 2011 the Florida Supreme Court made it more difficult for law enforcement to use a drug detection dog’s “alert” to a vehicle to provide officers “probable cause” to search a car without a warrant. In Clayton Harris vs. State, Florida Supreme Court Case No. SC08-1871 (April 21, 2011) the Court provided a uniform standard statewide in Florida of what the government must prove at a Motion to Suppress the warrantless search of an automobile or person to establish to a trial court… [read post]
29 Nov 2012, 1:44 pm by davidharrisauthor
A few weeks ago, I wrote a post  here about two cases heard by the U.S.  Supreme Court about police use of drug-sniffing dogs: Florida v. Jardines and Florida v. Harris.   But now comes news that technology may take us a step further than those cases would.  It seems that scientists have built a device that mimics the power and accuracy of the canine nose. Professors Carl Meinhart and Martin Moskovits at the University of California at Santa Barbara have engineered a device… [read post]
5 Aug 2012, 6:08 pm by Vin Bonventre
In this post, let's look at a few other situations in which New York's highest court, the Court of Appeals, requires some actual justification for a search, but the Supreme Court requires none--absolutely none. The differences are particularly pertinent in the discussion of New York City's aggressive stop and frisk policy. What about that policy? Well, according to the NYPD's own reports, [read post]
5 Aug 2012, 6:08 pm by Vin Bonventre
In this post, let's look at a few other situations in which New York's highest court, the Court of Appeals, requires some actual justification for a search, but the Supreme Court requires none--absolutely none. The differences are particularly pertinent in the discussion of New York City's aggressive stop and frisk policy. What about that policy? Well, according to the NYPD's own reports, [read post]
30 Oct 2012, 11:41 am by Jason Cheung
The old saying is that a dog is a man’s best friend, but this proverb wouldn’t apply if the best friend assisted in getting the man arrested. The use of dogs has continued to climb since the Supreme Court announced in U.S.  v. Place (1983) that the use of dogs to find drugs was not a search under the Fourth Amendment’s prohibition against search and seizures without a warrant. However, the latest case before the high Court asks whether the use of dogs triggers the other half of the Fourth… [read post]