Posts tagged with: "documents"
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11 Oct 2013, 3:04 am by legalinformatics
Professor Bernard Chao and Professor Dr. Derigan Silver, both of the University of Denver, have published A Case Study in Patent Litigation Transparency, forthcoming in Journal of Dispute Resolution. Here is the abstract: The courts have long recognized a general right to inspect and copy judicial documents. Yet, large swaths of filings in patent litigations are often inaccessible. This article takes a closer look at this phenomenon by examining a single case. The Monsanto v. DuPont dispute over… [read post]
15 Mar 2013, 5:28 pm by legalinformatics
There has been some discussion recently of a legal document cloud: a version, specifically for legal texts, of DocumentCloud, the online document repository for journalists that uses OpenCalais to perform semantic analysis and annotation of documents. [Here is a recent example of the use of DocumentCloud to annotate a legal text, in this instance the U.S. federal district court decision, in the National Security Letters case.] Alan deLevie said that a legal document cloud had been discussed during… [read post]
20 Dec 2009, 9:26 pm by legalinformatics
Dr. Adam Wyner of the University College London Department of Computer Science has posted slides from his tutorial of last week entitled Natural Language Processing Techniques for Managing Legal Resources on Semantic Web. The tutorial was offered in conjunction with last week’s JURIX 2009 conference in Rotterdam. Posted in Applications, Articles and papers, Conference papers, Conference proceedings Tagged: Adam Wyner, Legal informatics conferences, Legal knowledge representation, Legal natural… [read post]
14 Jul 2010, 11:13 am by legalinformatics
The transcript and the slides are available for the U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO)‘s Document Authentication Workshop, held 18 June 2010, at GPO in Washington, DC, USA. The workshop addressed many aspects of the authentication of digital legal information. GPO is the official publisher of many important sources of U.S. federal law, including statutes (United States Code, United States Statutes at Large, and Public and Private Laws), reports of the U.S. Supreme Court (United States Reports),… [read post]
22 Jan 2010, 12:57 pm by legalinformatics
Dr. Adam Wyner of the University College London Department of Computer Science has published a series of posts on legal information annotation and extraction, using GATE: The General Architecture for Text Engineering, on his blog, Language Logic Law Software. The content of these posts was presented in Dr. Wyner’s tutorial at JURIX 2009, the slides of which are available here. Posted in Applications, Others' scholarly or sophisticated blogposts, Technology developments, Technology tools Tagged:… [read post]
27 Dec 2013, 1:48 pm by legalinformatics
A call for papers has been issued for a special issue on the topic of ” Law, Language and Information Technology,” of the international journal, Informatica e diritto. Click here for the call in English. Click here for the call in Italian. The submission deadline for title and abstract is 15 January 2014. Here is a non-exclusive list of topics for the special issue: Linguistic quality in legal texts: assessing formal, technical and terminological quality; support to legislative… [read post]
9 Feb 2013, 1:05 pm by legalinformatics
Waldo Jaquith of The State Decoded, Elmer Masters of CALI, and Eric Mill of Sunlight Foundation yesterday had an interesting conversation on Twitter about appropriate syntax and formats for online legal resources, focusing on Markdown, AsciiDoc, and EPUB. They kindly agreed to let me to make a storify of their discussion, which is now available here. Thanks to Waldo, Elmer, and Eric. Filed under: Discussions, Storify Tagged: AsciiDoc and legal data, AsciiDoc and legal information, AsciiDoc and… [read post]
7 Aug 2012, 10:07 pm by legalinformatics
German federal laws and regulations appear to have been marked up in Markdown format and placed on GitHub, at https://github.com/bundestag/gesetze#german-federal-laws-and-regulations. According to the project’s ReadMe, “The source is the XML version of the laws from www.gesetze-im-internet.de “ Scrapers and other tools associated with this project appear to be on GitHub at https://github.com/bundestag/gesetze-tools. The project seems consistent with the recent trend commonly called… [read post]
7 Aug 2012, 10:07 pm by legalinformatics
German federal laws and regulations appear to have been marked up in Markdown format and placed on GitHub, at https://github.com/bundestag/gesetze#german-federal-laws-and-regulations. According to the project’s ReadMe, “The source is the XML version of the laws from www.gesetze-im-internet.de “ Scrapers and other tools associated with this project appear to be on GitHub at https://github.com/bundestag/gesetze-tools. The project seems consistent with the recent trend commonly called… [read post]
15 Jul 2010, 7:14 pm by legalinformatics
Dr. Simon Attfield of the Middlesex University School of Engineering and Information Sciences Interaction Design Centre, and Professor Ann Blandford of University College London UCL Interaction Centre, have published Discovery-Led Refinement in e-Discovery Investigations: Sensemaking, Cognitive Ergonomics and System Design, forthcoming in Artificial Intelligence and Law. Here is the abstract: Given the very large numbers of documents involved in e-discovery investigations, lawyers face a… [read post]
22 May 2010, 5:50 pm by legalinformatics
Professor Dr. Manfred Stede and Florian Kuhn, both of Universität Potsdam Department Linguistik, have published Identifying the Content Zones of German Court Decisions, in Business Information Systems Workshops: BIS 2009 International Workshops, Poznan, Poland, April 27-29, 2009, Revised Papers (2009). The paper was originally presented at LIT 2009: The 2nd Workshop on Legal Informatics and Legal Information Technology, held 28 April 2009 in Poznan, Poland. Here is the abstract of the paper: A… [read post]
22 May 2010, 2:45 pm by legalinformatics
Florian Kuhn of Universität Potsdam Department Linguistik will present a paper entitled A Description Language for Content Zones of German Court Decisions (for the full text of the paper, click here for the conference proceedings in PDF and scroll down to the page numbered 1) at SPLeT 2010: The 3rd Workshop on Semantic Processing of Legal Texts, to be held 23 May 2010 in Malta. The workshop is part of LREC 2010: The 7th International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation. Here is the… [read post]
13 May 2012, 3:38 pm by legalinformatics
Abe Voelker of the Wisconsin Court System has posted GitLaw: GitHub for Laws and Legal Documents – a Tourniquet for American Liberty, at his blog. In this post, Mr. Voelker advocates creating a version-control and version-tracking system for U.S. federal legislation using Git version tracking software. Mr. Voelker also endorses the creation of “a new markup language for legal doc[ument]s that would work similar[ly] to Markdown.” As a possible model he cites Fountain, “a… [read post]
1 Mar 2013, 6:06 pm by legalinformatics
María Hallo Carrasco of National Polytechnic School, Ecuador, and Professor Dr. M. Mercedes Martínez-González and Pablo de la Fuente Redondo, both of University of Valladolid, have published Data models for version management of legislative documents, forthcoming in Journal of Information Science. Here is the abstract: This paper surveys the main data models used in projects including the management of changes in digital normative legislation. Models have been classified based… [read post]
11 Jun 2010, 11:51 am by legalinformatics
Pam Greenberg of the National Conference of State Legislatures has published Preserving Legislative Digital Records (2010). Here is the abstract: In the last decade, technology and the Internet have opened access to the legislative process and created new ways for citizens to interact with their elected representatives. Legislative documents are created, tracked and transmitted electronically, and an unprecedented amount of information is being made available to the public online. This transition… [read post]
17 Mar 2013, 12:53 am by legalinformatics
Here are two recent items regarding service of legal documents via social media, in the context of U.S. law: Evan Brown, Esq., tells us that a U.S. federal district court has allowed service of documents via Facebook, in a case involving defendants located in India (FTC v. PCCare247 Inc., 2013 WL 841037 (S.D.N.Y. March 7, 2013)) The Wall Street Journal’s Law Blog tells us of a new Texas bill that would allow service of citation [i.e., summons] by social media (text of the bill, H. B.… [read post]
10 Apr 2013, 12:23 pm by legalinformatics
Casey Kuhlman, Esq., of Watershed Legal Services has posted legal-markdown to GitHub. Here are excerpts from the readme: This gem was built specifically to empower the creation of structured legal documents using markdown, and a markdown renderer. This gem acts as a middle layer by providing the user with structured headers and mixins that will greatly empower the use of md to create and maintain structured legal documents. [...] This gem will parse YAML Front Matter of Markdown Documents.… [read post]
7 Aug 2012, 10:07 pm by legalinformatics
German federal laws and regulations appear to have been marked up in Markdown format and placed on GitHub, at https://github.com/bundestag/gesetze#german-federal-laws-and-regulations. According to the project’s ReadMe, “The source is the XML version of the laws from www.gesetze-im-internet.de “ Scrapers and other tools associated with this project appear to be on GitHub at https://github.com/bundestag/gesetze-tools. The project seems consistent with the recent trend commonly called GitLaw. For… [read post]
17 Dec 2013, 12:39 pm by legalinformatics
Professor Jay A. Mitchell of Stanford Law School has posted a working paper entitled Putting Some Product into Work-Product: Corporate Lawyers Learning from Designers. Here is the abstract: Clients hire corporate lawyers to make useful things for them. Those things are documents, such as contracts and corporate bylaws. Lawyers have some good tools for making these products; standard forms and precedents from prior engagements are prime examples. But corporate lawyers don’t seem to use other… [read post]
It seemed like a dream to paper-burdened bankruptcy lawyers, this electronic filing stuff for bankruptcy courts. Go paperless! Save only signature pages. Prepare your schedules, have the client make the necessary changes and sign where needed, then prepare the PDF documents, use the /s/ digital signature, and file away. Sure, you keep the original "wet" signature pages. Sure, you scan the images of the package returned by the client containing the handwritten revisions. You end up with a very skinny… [read post]