Posts tagged with: "privacy"
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1 Jun 2010, 8:31 pm by legalinformatics
A revised version of my post entitled Context and Legal Informatics Research has been published on the VoxPopuLII Blog, published by the Legal Information Institute at Cornell University Law School. The post was originally published on Slaw, the Canadian legal blog. Thanks to Slaw’s editor, Professor Simon Fodden, for granting permission to repost. Here is the introduction: The relationship of legal information to context is a key dimension of recent developments in legal informatics scholarship… [read post]
10 Dec 2009, 8:09 am by Hunton & Williams LLP
On Monday, December 7, the Federal Trade Commission began a three-part series of roundtables collectively entitled "Exploring Privacy."  The conference opened with a presentation by Richard M. Smith featuring data flow charts he developed with FTC staff to illustrate the current “personal data ecosystem” and how personal information moves in various online and offline contexts.  The charts that served as the basis for his discussion (available here) offer a sense of the FTC’s understanding… [read post]
12 Mar 2012, 12:16 pm by Rosanne Kay
This post was written by Cynthia O'Donoghue. The Article 29 Working Party has again told two online advertising groups, the Interactive Advertising Bureau (“IAB”) and the European Advertising Standards Alliance (“EASA”), that their proposed code of conduct for data tracking was still unsuitable as it failed to satisfy the requirements of EU privacy laws, and suggested adoption of the standards unveiled by the World Wide Web Consortium (“W3C”). The proposed code had already been… [read post]
15 May 2010, 11:27 am by legalinformatics
Dr. Guillaume Aucher of the University of Luxembourg Faculty of Sciences, Technology and Communication, Professor Guido Boella of Università degli Studi di Torino Dipartimento di Informatica , and Professor Dr. Leon van der Torre of the University of Luxembourg Faculty of Sciences, Technology and Communication, presented Privacy Regulations in Dynamic Epistemic Deontic Logic, at NMR 2010: The 13th International Workshop on Non-Monotonic Reasoning, held 14-16 May 2010, at Sutton Place, Toronto,… [read post]
18 Jun 2012, 12:19 pm by Shaun Kaufman
Two companies that violated consumer privacy were Google and Facebook In April, President Obama announced new guidelines for Internet companies (such as Google, Apple and Facebook) that would limit what consumer data the company can capture from consumers and keep. Consumer privacy has been a hot issue, especially after high-profile companies like Apple and Google became embroiled in controversy surrounding online user data. President Obama developed this initiative after it was learned that Apple… [read post]
12 Jan 2010, 11:00 am by Hunton & Williams LLP
In a discussion with The New York Times, Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) Chairman Jon Leibowitz, and chief of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, David Vladeck, indicated that Internet publishers and advertisers can expect the FTC to play a more active role in safeguarding consumer privacy.  Chairman Leibowitz highlighted that, in the past, the FTC’s approach to privacy has focused on consumer notice and consent, and whether consumers were harmed.  From the FTC’s perspective,… [read post]
11 Oct 2012, 5:00 am by Ruth Carter
Cholla Trail Landmark – Camelback Mountain by Dru Bloomfield – At Home in Scottsdale Last week Pete Kosednar was hiking on Camelback Mountain when he saw a woman on the trail who didn’t have her dog on a leash. He turned on his video camera and asked her is she knew that her dog was supposed to be leashed. She didn’t appreciate being filmed and reacted by swearing at him and hitting him. Check out the video for yourself. Was Pete Kosednar wrong to film this woman? No! She… [read post]
24 Nov 2010, 8:14 am by Scott Peppet
Various news outlets are reporting that Google “fans” in Germany have been egging the roughly 3% of houses whose inhabitants have chosen to opt out of Google’s Street View mapping feature. Why? Apparently the vandals left notes saying “Google is cool.”  So maybe this is just a “how dare you question anything Google?” protest. But more likely it is something more. Jeff Jarvis on Buzz Machine recently labeled opting out of Street View the equivalent of “digital desecration,” saying… [read post]
31 Aug 2010, 9:59 am by Daniel Solove
For the 10th-anniversary issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education’s The Chronicle Review, the editors asked several scholars for answers to the question: “What will be the defining idea of the coming decade, and why?” Here’s the list of the people they asked: Jaron Lanier, Daniel J. Solove, Peter Singer, Elaine Howard Ecklund, Gwenda Kaczor, Jonathan Haidt, Parker J. Palmer, Camille Paglia, Yi-Fu Tuan, Michael Glenwood Gibbs, Daniel J. Cohen, James Elkins, Mary Beard, Linda K. Kerber,… [read post]
21 Aug 2013, 5:15 am by
According to ABC News in Chicago, a former Northwestern University student has claimed that after she was admitted to Northwestern Memorial Hospital a doctor took photos of her without her consent and posted them online.  This is not the first time that it has been alleged that an employee in the medical field has posted online photos of patients without their consent.  Unfortunately, this will not be the last time either.    The doctor allegedly posted photographs of the… [read post]
16 Mar 2011, 12:06 pm by Hunton & Williams LLP
On March 16, 2011, U.S. Department of Commerce Assistant Secretary for Communications and Information Lawrence Strickling called on Congress to enact robust, baseline legislation to “reform consumer data privacy in the Internet economy.” Speaking before the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, Assistant Secretary Strickling emphasized the Department of Commerce’s support for a legislative proposal that would adopt many of the recommendations of the “Green Paper,”… [read post]
15 Mar 2012, 9:09 am by Lisa Baird
This post was written by Nancy E. Bonifant and Brad M. Rostolsky. On March 13, 2012, the HHS Office of Civil Rights (OCR) announced the first enforcement action resulting from a breach self-report required by HITECH’s Breach Notification Rule. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee (BCBST) has agreed to pay HHS $1,500,000 to settle potential violations of the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules and has entered into a corrective action plan to address gaps in its HIPAA compliance program. The… [read post]
21 Aug 2013, 5:15 am by
According to ABC News in Chicago, a former Northwestern University student has claimed that after she was admitted to Northwestern Memorial Hospital a doctor took photos of her without her consent and posted them online.  This is not the first time that it has been alleged that an employee in the medical field has posted online photos of patients without their consent.  Unfortunately, this will not be the last time either.    The doctor allegedly posted photographs of the… [read post]
2 Mar 2012, 5:49 am by Rosanne Kay
This post was written by Cynthia O'Donoghue. On 27 February 2012, with the support of Europe’s largest mobile operators, the GSMA published a set of global Privacy Design Guidelines for Mobile Application Development. These guidelines come just days after the largest US based App providers, including Google, Apple and Amazon, agreed to legally enforceable privacy standards. The Mobile App Privacy Design Guidelines are aimed at all companies who are responsible for collecting and processing… [read post]
21 Apr 2012, 2:02 pm by Peter Swire
Along with a lot of other privacy folks, I have a lot of concerns about the cybersecurity legislation moving through Congress.  I had an op-ed in The Hill yesterday going through some of the concerns, notably the problems with the over broad  ”information sharing” provisions. Writing the op-ed, though, prompted me to highlight one positive step that should happen in the course of the cybersecurity debate.  The Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board was designed in large part to address… [read post]
2 Feb 2011, 3:56 pm by Andrew Hoffman
Hot on the trail of the FTC’s recent report on privacy, the GSMA, the London-based industry association representing over 800 cellular network operators worldwide, released its “high-level” Mobile Privacy Principles (the “Principles”) on January 27, 2011. The Principles were released with the goal of creating a “robust and effective framework for the protection of privacy” to promote users’ confidence and trust in mobile applications. These Principles encourage a “privacy by… [read post]
1 Nov 2012, 5:30 am by Joseph Lazzarotti
Have you received this letter? If you did, it is part of Attorney General Kamala D. Harris efforts to formally notify scores of mobile application developers and companies that they are not in compliance with one aspect of California's privacy law. Letters are being sent out to up to 100 non-compliant apps at this time, starting with those who have the most popular apps available on mobile platforms. Even if you have not received the letter, you may want to think about whether you need to… [read post]
12 Apr 2012, 10:32 am by Stanford Law Review
The Stanford Law Review Online has just published Chief Judge Alex Kozinski's Keynote from our 2012 Symposium, The Dead Past. Chief Judge Kozinski discusses the privacy implications of our increasingly digitized world and our role as a society in shaping the law: I must start out with a confession: When it comes to technology, I'm what you might call a troglodyte. I don't own a Kindle or an iPad or an iPhone or a Blackberry. I don't have an avatar or even voicemail. I don't text. I don't reject… [read post]
6 Jul 2013, 6:21 am by legalinformatics
Professor Dr. Bert-Jaap Koops and Professor Dr. Ronald Leenes, both of Tilburg University TILT, have published Privacy regulation cannot be hardcoded. A critical comment on the ‘privacy by design’ provision in data-protection law, forthcoming in International Review of Law, Computers and Technology. Here is the abstract: ‘Privacy by design’ is an increasingly popular paradigm. It is the principle or concept that privacy should be promoted as a default setting of every new ICT… [read post]
16 Oct 2012, 6:34 am
According to Reuters, the European Union has sent Google a letter demanding changes to Google's new privacy policy to better protect the personal data of its users.  The Guardian is reporting that Google may be told on Tuesday to revisit the controversial changes introduced in March. On January 24, 2012, Google announced that as of March 1, 2012, it would revamp its privacy policies.  At the time of its announcement, Google stated that it had more than 70 privacy policies and that it is… [read post]