January 2012 Technology Top Blawgs

  1. Group blog with a broad emphasis on legal topics. By Professors Daniel J. Solove, Kaimipono Wenger, Dave Hoffman, Frank Pasquale, Deven Desai, Danielle Citron, Lawrence Cunningham, Sarah Waldeck, Jaya Ramji-Nogales, Solangel Maldonado and Gerard Magliocca.
  2. Covers legal research tools, notable websites and blogs, web site design, search engine optimization and marketing for law firms.
  3. Covers legal technology, technology law and other musings. By Dennis Kennedy.
  4. Discusses how businesses should respond to software audits by the Software and Information Industry Association (SIIA). By Robert J. Scott.
  5. Covers law, information technology, intellectual property and new media. By Andis Kaulins.
  6. Covers online legal services, document automation, and virtual lawyering. By DirectLaw.
  7. By University of Miami law professor Michael Froomkin. Covers civil liberties, the Internet, Guantanamo, Iraq attrocities, politics and more.
  8. Covers Internet, technology and online marketing legal issues. Published by Santa Clara University School of Law Professor Eric Goldman.
  9. Harvard Law School Berkman Center for Internet & Society Podcast.
  10. Tracking new and intriguing Web sites for the legal profession.
  11. KZSU-FM (Stanford) Tech/Law Talk Show. Hosted by Dave Levine.
  12. Focused on keeping politician's hands off the 'net and everything else related to technology.
  13. Covers the use of technology and computers in the legal profession. By Finis Price.
  14. Comments on technology deals and companies. By Harry Boadwee.
  15. Covers technology policy trends, insight and news. By Sean Garrett.
  16. Covers privacy, liberty, security, economy and their interaction. By Andreas Busch.
  17. Covers privacy, crime and security online. From Wired News.
  18. Speaks freely about legal and policy issues facing the media and the internet. By Peter Black.
  19. Covers cyberlaw. By Lilian Edwards
  20. Describes the interplay between legal responses to exogenous change and the law's own endogenous capacity for adaptation. By Louis D. Brandeis Dean Jim Chen.