Search for: "New York Times Co. v. Sullivan" Results 181 - 200 of 396
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13 Aug 2015, 5:42 am
The court also concluded that, where the government has opened up space on its own buses for advertising, the New York Times Co. v. [read post]
7 Aug 2015, 6:07 am by Marie-Andree Weiss
But his speech is constitutionally protected, and fully consistent with our “profound national commitment to the principle that debate on public issues should be uninhibited, robust, and wide-open, and that it may well include vehement, caustic, and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials” New York Times Co. v. [read post]
17 Jul 2015, 7:39 am
After we vacated the conviction and gave Arizona a chance to re-try Milke, the Arizona Court of Appeals barred any re-trial in an opinion so scathing it made the New York Times. [read post]
10 Jun 2015, 3:37 pm
The New York case of Travelers Indemnity Company, cited above, was decided in 1962. [read post]
4 Jun 2015, 6:08 am
Parke, Davis & Co., 297 N.W.2d 252, 258 (Minn. 1980); Dadd v. [read post]
12 Nov 2014, 12:31 pm by Media Law Prof
Cass, Center for the Rule of Law, Cass & Associates, PC; Boston University School of Law, is publishing Weighing Constitutional Anchors: New York Times Co. v. [read post]
31 Oct 2014, 5:00 am by Stephen Wermiel
Brennan’s Fight to Preserve the Legacy of New York Times v, Sullivan, sometimes the Justices simply could not decide a case, and the outcome flipped within the Court. [read post]
As summarized above, combined commercial and noncommercial speech that “communicates information, expresses opinion, recites grievances, protests claimed abuses, or solicits financial support on behalf of a movement whose existence and objectives are matters of public concern, [] is not purely commercial” and is afforded full First Amendment protection. [15]  In City of New York v. [read post]
25 Sep 2014, 6:57 am
The statute also allows punishment for false statements on matters of public concern, even without a showing of “actual malice” in the sense set forth by New York Times Co. v. [read post]