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10 Oct 2011, 4:16 pm by Eugene Volokh
(Eugene Volokh) I’m delighted to report that Clark Neily of the Institute for Justice will be guest-blogging this week, about IJ’s “judicial engagement” project. [read post]
9 Oct 2013, 2:15 pm by Eugene Volokh
(Eugene Volokh) Clark Neily of the Institute for Justice guest-blogged here about “judicial engagement” last year, so I thought I’d note his new book, Terms of Engagement: How Our Courts Should Enforce the Constitution’s Promise of Limited Government. [read post]
(Clark Neily (Institute for Justice), guest-blogging) First, I’d like to thank Eugene for the opportunity to guest-blog about judicial engagement this week.The Institute for Justice coined the term “judicial engagement” (and created the Center for Judicial Engagement) out of our conviction that America has more government than the Constitution authorizes and that this is largely due to the failure of our… [read post]
(Clark Neily (Institute for Justice), guest-blogging) As discussed in my first two posts, the Institute for Justice coined the term “judicial engagement” out of our conviction that judges are not properly enforcing constitutional limits on government power. [read post]
(Clark Neily (Institute for Justice), guest-blogging) The key question posed by the Institute for Justice’s call for judicial engagement is not whether everyone can agree on a single theory of the Constitution, but whether we should insist that judges make a sincere effort to interpret and apply the Constitution in all cases.It appears most people believe there are at least some unenumerated constitutional rights that courts… [read post]
(Clark Neily (Institute for Justice), guest-blogging) Last fall I wrote a series of posts explaining the Institute for Justice’s call for “judicial engagement” and the rejection of reflexive deference toward other branches of government. [read post]
(Clark Neily (Institute for Justice), guest-blogging) As I noted yesterday, the Institute for Justice created the Center for Judicial Engagement in response to our belief that America has more government today than the Constitution authorizes and that courts are systematically failing to enforce constitutional limits on government power. [read post]