Search for: "Company Doe v. Public Citizen" Results 281 - 300 of 1,975
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27 Feb 2014, 6:00 am
Plaintiff James Dean, Inc. filed a trademark complaint against Twitter, as well as the fictitious persons, John Doe Defendants 1-5 Company, in an Indiana state court. [read post]
19 Oct 2009, 2:04 pm
The author of "Public Use and Public Purpose after Kelo v. [read post]
6 Oct 2014, 1:33 pm by Arthur F. Coon
The North Coast Railroad Authority (NCRA), a public agency established by state law, contracted with Northwestern Pacific Railroad Company (NWPRC) to allow NWPRC to conduct freight services on tracks controlled by NCRA. [read post]
25 Apr 2011, 7:37 pm by Frank Pasquale
The Supreme Court will soon hear oral arguments in Sorrell v. [read post]
6 Oct 2014, 5:43 am
As Justice Holmes stated in Crowley v Pulsifer (137 Mass 392 [1884]): It is desirable that the trial of cases should take place under public eye, not because the controversies of one citizen are of public concern, but because it is of the highest moment that those who administer [read post]
16 Jan 2018, 6:00 am by Ashley Deeks
Nor does it possess a database containing every citizen’s photograph. [read post]
19 Sep 2008, 12:05 pm
Indeed, respondents essentially concede that if an entity is a "public body" for purposes of the OML, it is a public "agency" for purposes of FOIL (see generally Perez, 5 NY3d at 528), although the converse is not necessarily true (see Citizens for Alternatives to Animal Labs, Inc. v Board of Trustees of State Univ. of New York, 92 NY2d 357, 362 [1998]). [read post]
14 Aug 2017, 8:40 am by Graham Smith
The Canadian Supreme Court decision in Equustek and the French Conseil d'Etat decision to make a CJEU reference in Google v CNIL have once again focused attention on the intractable issues around cross-border liability for publication on the internet. [read post]
14 Aug 2017, 8:40 am by Graham Smith
The Canadian Supreme Court decision in Equustek and the French Conseil d'Etat decision to make a CJEU reference in Google v CNIL have once again focused attention on the intractable issues around cross-border liability for publication on the internet. [read post]