Search for: "David Fontana" Results 1 - 20 of 142
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8 May 2019, 2:03 am by Family Law
David Fontana & Naomi Schoenbaum have recently posted to SSRN their article Unsexing Pregnancy, 119 Columbia Law Review__ (forthcoming 2019). [read post]
15 Jan 2014, 12:18 pm by Howard Wasserman
David Fontana (GW) has a piece at HuffPost on The Return of the Jewish Athlete, discussing some sociological and demographic causes for the recent revival (relatively speaking, of course) of Jewish athletes. [read post]
29 Apr 2015, 7:58 am by Howard Wasserman
David Fontana and Donald Braman (both of GW) discuss their study showing that, on the question of marriage equality, people do not [ed: oops] care whether marriage equality is established by SCOTUS or by Congress. [read post]
23 Dec 2009, 5:52 pm by Lawrence Solum
David Fontana (George Washington University Law School) has posted The Imperialism of American Constitutional Law (American Journal of Comparative Law, Vol. 56, p. 1085, 2008) on SSRN. [read post]
21 Dec 2009, 6:45 am by Lawrence Solum
David Fontana (George Washington University Law School) has posted The Second American Revolution in the Separation of Powers (Texas Law Review, Vol. 87, p. 1409, 2009) on SSRN. [read post]
22 Dec 2009, 5:43 am
The Second American Revolution in the Separation of Powers has just been posted by David Fontana, George Washington University Law School. [read post]
2 Feb 2011, 6:32 am by Lawrence Solum
David Fontana (George Washington University Law School) has posted The Rise and Fall of Comparative Constitutional Law in the Postwar Era (Yale Journal of International Law, Vol. 36, p. 1, 2011) on SSRN. [read post]
22 Dec 2009, 7:11 am by Lawrence Solum
David Fontana (George Washington University Law School) has posted The Permanent and Presidential Transition Models of Political Party Policy Leadership (Northwestern University Law Review Colloquy, Vol. 103, p. 393, 2009) on SSRN. [read post]
2 Feb 2011, 8:15 am by Mary L. Dudziak
The Rise and Fall of Comparative Constitutional Law in the Postwar Era has just been posted by David Fontana, George Washington University Law School. [read post]
7 Feb 2011, 11:39 am by Sean Patrick Donlan
David Fontana (George Washington University Law School)’s ‘The Rise and Fall of Comparative Constitutional Law in the Postwar Era’, to be published in the (2011) 36 Yale Journal of International Law 1 is on SSRN here. [read post]
18 Dec 2009, 6:35 am by Lawrence Solum
David Fontana (George Washington University Law School) has posted Government in Opposition (Yale Law Journal, Vol. 119, p. 548, 2009) on SSRN. [read post]
20 May 2010, 11:19 am by Lawrence Solum
Check out The Postradical Legal Generation: Elite law schools, and the court nominees who come from them, have changed by David Fontana on The Chronicle of Higher Education online. [read post]
13 Oct 2011, 3:30 pm by Lawrence Solum
David Fontana and Donald Braman (George Washington University Law School and Cultural Cognition Project) have posted Judicial Backlash or Just Backlash? [read post]
2 May 2007, 11:00 am
Posted by Alan Childress My GW colleague David Fontana has published this editorial in the National Law Journal on the U.S. [read post]
13 Jan 2012, 11:40 am by Rick Hasen
David Fontana and Donald Braman have written this article for The New Republic. [read post]
11 Sep 2017, 6:30 am by Dan Ernst
David Fontana, George Washington University Law School, has posted Federal Decentralization, which is forthcoming in the Virginia Law Review:Constitutional law relies on the diffusion of powers among different institutions to ensure that no one person or faction controls power. [read post]
5 Jul 2018, 8:55 am by Amanda Frost
In a responsive essay, Professor David Fontana cautions that Nelson and Gibson may have “created a false sense of security that the public deeply and durably believes in the Supreme Court. [read post]
15 Jun 2016, 11:00 am by CrimProf BlogEditor
David Fontana has this post at PrawfsBlawg, commending this book by David Dagan and Steven Teles for explaining "why many conservatives changed their mind about criminal justice issues. [read post]