Search for: "Flood v. Kuhn" Results 21 - 38 of 38
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29 Aug 2013, 5:20 am by Amy Howe
” Earlier this summer, Justice Sonia Sotomayor presided over a reenactment of the oral argument in Flood v. [read post]
24 May 2013, 7:19 am by Allison Trzop
Kuhn, the unsuccessful challenge to baseball’s antitrust exemption by baseball player Curt Flood. [read post]
22 Mar 2013, 8:00 am by Dan Ernst
The book looks at such pivotal cases as the 1922 Supreme Court case which held that federal antitrust laws did not apply to baseball; the 1972 Flood v. [read post]
5 Apr 2012, 7:48 am by J
  (I admit that I have been completely stumped by some of his questions, even when I have re-taken the quiz as a professor).Less successful was Justice Blackmun's frivolous Part I to Flood v. [read post]
1 Jan 2012, 8:19 am by J. Gordon Hylton
Forty-five years ago, the baseball world trained its attention on the Wisconsin Supreme Court and its impending decision in the case of Wisconsin v. [read post]
20 Jun 2008, 12:32 pm
Davies, Professor of Law at the George Mason University School of Law and Editor-in-Chief of The Green Bag, critically analyzes a yarn told about Justice Harry Blackman in Bob Woodward and Scott Armstrong's legendary book The Brethren: Inside the Supreme Court.In The Brethren, Woodward and Armstrong maintain that in Blackmun's first draft of his famous ode to baseball, found in the introductory paragraphs to the High Court's opinion in Flood v. [read post]
16 Mar 2007, 10:43 am
  Here's some reading to enjoy on this last day of vacation: Randy Barnett's op-ed on Raich in The Wall Street JournalDahlia Lithwick and Jack Goldsmith's take on the US Att'y firings in Slate An obit of Bowie Kuhn, of the famous Flood v. [read post]
29 Oct 2006, 2:33 am
Louis Cardinals, who rejected a trade to the Philadelphia Phillies after the 1969 season, and challenged baseball's "reserve" clause - a standard contractual provision that bound professional baseball players to their teams for life - all the way to the Supreme Court (see Kuhn v. [read post]