Search for: "Gaston County v. United States" Results 1 - 14 of 14
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16 Apr 2010, 11:04 am by LRToday
  On March 23, 2010, the United States Supreme Court heard oral argument in New Process Steel v. [read post]
23 Jun 2017, 10:16 am by Staley Smith
Writing for the majority in Maslenjak v. [read post]
22 Apr 2021, 5:20 pm by Phil Dixon
The defendant was tried and convicted of first-degree murder in Gaston County. [read post]
5 May 2015, 11:41 am by Matthew R. Arnold, Esq.
Arnold is admitted to practice in all state courts in North Carolina, in the United States Federal Court for the Western District of North Carolina, in the North Carolina Court of Appeals and Supreme Court, and in the Fourth Circuit United States Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia. [read post]
21 Dec 2020, 11:56 am by Phil Dixon
In this Sampson County case, the defendant was convicted of felony fleeing to elude, habitual felon, and habitual impaired driving. [read post]
9 May 2012, 8:08 am by Matthew C. Bouchard, Esq.
  In response to the decision, NCDOT Secretary Gene Conti released this statement: “We have received the opinion from the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit on the Monroe Bypass case. [read post]
6 Dec 2013, 11:55 am by Bill Marler
  For example, produce has, since at least 1991, been the source of substantial numbers of outbreak-related E. coli O157:H7 infections.[19]  Other unusual vehicles for causing E. coli O157:H7 infections have included apple juice, yogurt, dried salami, and mayonnaise.[20] According to a recent study, an “estimated 73,480 illnesses due to E. coli O157:H7 infections occur each year in the United States, leading to an estimated 2,168 hospitalizations and sixty-one… [read post]
16 Aug 2015, 9:33 am by Bill Marler
For example, produce has, since at least 1991, been the source of substantial numbers of outbreak-related E. coli O157:H7 infections.[19] Other unusual vehicles for causing E. coli O157:H7 infections have included apple juice, yogurt, dried salami, and mayonnaise.[20] According to a recent study, an “estimated 73,480 illnesses due to E. coli O157:H7 infections occur each year in the United States, leading to an estimated 2,168 hospitalizations and sixty-one deaths annually. [read post]
5 Dec 2013, 8:07 pm by Bill Marler
  For example, produce has, since at least 1991, been the source of substantial numbers of outbreak-related E. coli O157:H7 infections.[19]  Other unusual vehicles for causing E. coli O157:H7 infections have included apple juice, yogurt, dried salami, and mayonnaise.[20] According to a recent study, an “estimated 73,480 illnesses due to E. coli O157:H7 infections occur each year in the United States, leading to an estimated 2,168 hospitalizations and sixty-one… [read post]
16 Apr 2019, 2:33 am by Patti Waller
E. coliO157:H7 is one of thousands of serotypes Escherichia coli.[1] The combination of letters and numbers in the name of the E. coli O157:H7 refers to the specific antigens (proteins which provoke an antibody response) found on the body and tail or flagellum[2] respectively and distinguish it from other types of E. coli.[3] Most serotypes of E. coli are harmless and live as normal flora in the intestines of healthy humans and animals.[4]  The E. coli bacterium is among the most… [read post]