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17 Jun 2020, 9:38 am
Henning Lahmann (ESMT Berlin - Digital Society Institute) has published Information Operations and the Question of Illegitimate Interference under International Law (Israel Law Review, Vol. 53, no. 2, pp. 189-224, July 2020). [read post]
5 Apr 2020, 8:04 am
Henning Lahmann (Digital Society Institute) has published Unilateral Remedies to Cyber Operations: Self-Defence, Countermeasures, Necessity, and the Question of Attribution (Cambridge Univ. [read post]
10 May 2020, 6:57 pm
Henning Lahmann (ESMT Berlin - Digital Society Institute) has published Unilateral Remedies to Cyber Operations: Self-Defence, Countermeasures, Necessity, and the Question of Attribution (Cambridge Univ. [read post]
6 Nov 2017, 11:39 pm
Henderson, Patrick Keane & Josh Liddy, Remote and Autonomous Warfare Systems: Precautions in Attack and Individual Accountability Robin Geiß & Henning Lahmann, Autonomous Weapons Systems: A Paradigm Shift for the Law of Armed Conflict Peter Margulies, Making Autonomous Targeting Accountable: Command Responsibility for Computer-Guided Lethal Force in Armed Conflicts Michael W. [read post]
31 Oct 2012, 9:43 am
Contents include:Robin Geiß & Henning Lahmann, Cyber Warfare: Applying the Principle of Distinction in an Interconnected Space Tom Ruys, The XM25 Individual Airburst Weapon System: A ‘Game Changer’ for the (Law on the) Battlefield? [read post]
8 May 2020, 8:49 am by Elliot Setzer
Henning Lahmann argued that International Court of Justice precedent will probably thwart any efforts to make China pay compensation for damages caused by the coronavirus. [read post]
9 May 2020, 8:31 am by Elliot Setzer
And Patja Howell shared an episode of The Lawfare Podcast in which Taylor sat down with Tony Mills, director of science policy at the R Street Institute, to talk about Congress’s institutional limitations in responding to the coronavirus: Henning Lahmann argued that International Court of Justice precedent will probably thwart any efforts to make China pay compensation for damages caused by the coronavirus. [read post]