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6 Jan 2020, 6:30 am by Dan Ernst
Julian Davis Mortenson and Nicholas Bagley, University of Michigan Law School, have posted Delegation at the Founding:This article refutes the claim that the nondelegation doctrine was part of the original constitutional understanding. [read post]
11 Sep 2019, 8:00 am by Karen Tani
The University of Michigan Legal History Workshop has announced its Fall 2019 lineup:SEPTEMBER 10: Julian Davis Mortenson, University of Michigan Law School, “The Executive Power Clause of the U.S. [read post]
4 Jul 2019, 9:05 pm by Alana Bevan
In an article for the Columbia Law Review, professor Julian Davis Mortenson of University of Michigan Law School argued that this provision was understood by the founders to be an “empty vessel,” merely allowing the President to carry out “projects defined by a prior exercise of the legislative power. [read post]
25 Jun 2019, 6:30 am by Dan Ernst
Julian Davis Mortenson, University of Michigan Law School, has posted The Executive Power Clause, which is forthcoming in the University of Pennsylvania Law Review 119 (2019):Article II of the Constitution vests “the executive power” in the President. [read post]
25 Jun 2019, 4:55 am by Lawrence Solum
Julian Davis Mortenson (University of Michigan Law School) has posted The Executive Power Clause (University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Vol. 119) on SSRN. [read post]
8 Mar 2019, 5:07 am by Julian Davis Mortenson
The nation's force mustered in service of the nation's will.Thanks once again to Eugene for the opportunity to share this research from "Article II Vests the Executive Power, Not the Royal Prerogative. [read post]
4 Mar 2019, 6:02 am by Joe Hodnicki
From the abstract for Julian Davis Mortenson, Article II Vests Executive Power, Not the Royal Prerogative, Columbia Law Review, Forthcoming: Article II of the United States Constitution vests “the executive power” in the President. [read post]
4 Mar 2019, 5:14 am by Julian Davis Mortenson
Against the Imperial Presidency.When the Founders agreed that "[t]he executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America," the core phrase had a single, simple, and uncontested meaning. [read post]
4 Mar 2019, 4:02 am by Lawrence Solum
Julian Davis Mortenson (University of Michigan Law School) has posted Article II Vests Executive Power, Not the Royal Prerogative (Columbia Law Review, Forthcoming) on SSRN. [read post]
3 Mar 2019, 11:10 pm by Eugene Volokh
Julian Davis Mortenson of the University of Michigan Law School will be guest-blogging this week about his new article (forthcoming in the Columbia Law Review), Article II Vests Executive Power, Not the Royal Prerogative: Article II of the United States Constitution vests "the executive power" in the President. [read post]
12 Feb 2019, 8:00 am by Dan Ernst
Julian Davis Mortenson, University of Michigan Law School, has posted Article II Vests Executive Power, Not the Royal Prerogative,which is forthcoming in the Columbia Law Review:Article II of the United States Constitution vests “the executive power” in the President. [read post]
31 May 2018, 7:45 am
Nicaragua) Contemporary Practice of the United States Relating to International LawKristina Daugirdas & Julian Davis Mortenson, Contemporary Practice of the United States Relating to International Law Recent Books on International LawAnna Spain Bradley, reviewing The Internationalists: How A Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World, by Oona A. [read post]
17 Feb 2018, 6:53 pm
Al-Bashir Contemporary Practice of the United States Relating to International LawKristina Daugirdas & Julian Davis Mortenson, Contemporary Practice of the United States Relating to International Law Recent Books on International LawMonica Hakimi, The Theory and Practice at the Intersection Between Human Rights and Humanitarian Law Peter H. [read post]
1 Dec 2017, 11:52 am
The Argentine Republic ICSID Contemporary Practice of the United States Relating to International LawKristina Daugirdas & Julian Davis Mortenson, Contemporary Practice of the United States Relating to International Law Recent Books on International LawDeborah Pearlstein, reviewing How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything. by Rosa Brooks Adam S. [read post]
15 Sep 2017, 9:11 pm
AB on the Interpretation of Article E)(2) of the Fundamental Law Contemporary Practice of the United States Relating to International LawKristina Daugirdas & Julian Davis Mortenson, Contemporary Practice of the United States Relating to International Law Recent Books on International LawKevin L. [read post]
13 Jul 2017, 11:50 pm
Suriname Contemporary Practice of the United States Relating to International LawKristina Daugirdas & Julian Davis Mortenson, Contemporary Practice of the United States Relating to International Law Recent Books on International LawTom Ginsburg, reviewing A World of Struggle: How Power, Law and Expertise Shape Global Political Economy, by David Kennedy John R. [read post]
15 Mar 2017, 2:56 am
Oriental Republic of Uruguay Nicholas Petrie, De Leopoldo LópezContemporary Practice of the United States Relating to International LawKristina Daugirdas & Julian Davis Mortenson, Contemporary Practice of the United States Relating to International Law Recent Books on International LawNico Schrijver, reviewing The Thin Justice of International Law: A Moral Reckoning of the Law of Nations, by Steven R. [read post]