Search for: "Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons, Inc." Results 41 - 60 of 165
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30 Oct 2012, 4:00 am by Terry Hart
On Monday, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Kirtsaeng v John Wiley & Sons, a case dealing with the impact of copyright’s first sale doctrine — 17 USC § 109(a) — on the Copyright Act’s importation prohibition — 17 USC § 602(a)(1). [read post]
29 Apr 2013, 8:11 am by Sandy
The Supreme Court, having reversed the Second Circuit's decision in Kirtsaeng v. [read post]
20 Mar 2013, 10:39 am by Marc Hearron
BACKGROUND John Wiley & Sons, Inc. is an academic textbook publisher that sells textbooks both in the United States and abroad. [read post]
30 Oct 2012, 4:00 am by Terry Hart
On Monday, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Kirtsaeng v John Wiley & Sons, a case dealing with the impact of copyright’s first sale doctrine — 17 USC § 109(a) — on the Copyright Act’s importation prohibition — 17 USC § 602(a)(1). [read post]
John Wiley & Sons, Inc. that the common-law doctrine barring restraints on alienation that is the basis of exhaustion doctrine “makes no geographical distinctions,” a sale of a patented article – authorized by the U.S. patentee – that takes place outside the United States exhausts the U.S. patent rights in that article. [read post]
20 Mar 2013, 9:36 pm by Kim Nayyer
John Wiley & Sons, the Court considered the “first sale” doctrine of copyright law. [read post]
23 Jun 2016, 4:26 am
John Wiley & Sons, 568 U.S. ___ (2013) (see Kat report here).This time around, the question presented was whether Kirtsaeng could recover his attorney’s fees (totalling over $2 million) from John Wiley & Sons. [read post]
27 Apr 2016, 10:00 pm
John Wiley & Sons, is a dispute over copyrighted textbooks produced overseas but imported to the United States and resold by Kirtsaeng without the publisher's permission. [read post]
28 Mar 2013, 8:42 am
John Wiley & Sons, Inc., the answer to this question is yes. [read post]
17 Jun 2016, 3:21 am by Amy Howe
John Wiley & Sons, in which the Court weighed in on the standard for fee-shifting under the Copyright Act, comes from Ronald Mann for this blog. [read post]