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9 Sep 2020, 9:01 pm by Leslie C. Griffin
In July 2020, in Our Lady of Guadalupe School v. [read post]
17 Jun 2020, 9:00 pm by Leslie C. Griffin
On June 15, 2020, advocates of LGBTQ rights won a 6-3 Supreme Court victory in Bostock v. [read post]
15 Jul 2020, 9:01 pm by Leslie C. Griffin
The ministerial exception is a First Amendment rule that allows race discrimination cases against religious organizations to be dismissed.Racial Discrimination Cases Are DismissedA federal district court in Georgia (2007) rejected on ministerial exception grounds the lawsuit by an African American pastor, the “director of worship arts,” for race discrimination. [read post]
27 Feb 2019, 9:01 pm by Leslie C. Griffin
Everybody knows that you can’t put a cross on a Jewish soldier’s grave. [read post]
16 Aug 2018, 9:01 pm by Leslie C. Griffin
Some supporters of Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court praise him as a warrior for religious liberty. [read post]
5 Jul 2018, 9:00 pm by Leslie C. Griffin
Justice Breyer’s dissenting opinion in NIFLA v. [read post]
25 Apr 2022, 9:01 pm by Leslie C. Griffin
This is a case about a public school football coach, Joseph Kennedy, who prayed at the end of football games. [read post]
12 Dec 2021, 9:01 pm by Marci A. Hamilton and Leslie C. Griffin
We believe in the separation of church and state because it requires religions to obey laws enacted by the state instead of allowing religions to hold everyone to their own religious laws.This idea of separation is much disputed these days, as religions continue to gain more victories in the courts. [read post]
28 Jul 2021, 9:01 pm by Leslie C. Griffin
I first met Beverly Brazauskas in the late 1980s, when she was the Assistant Director of Religious Education at the Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend, Indiana. [read post]
17 Dec 2014, 3:40 am by Amy Howe
   At Hamilton and Griffin on Rights, Leslie Shoebotham suggests that, although the decision’s “expansion of what qualifies as a ‘reasonable mistake’ is understandably an attention-grabbing headline,” its “real impact may be in opening the door more generally to arguments that police mistakes don’t violate the Fourth Amendment. [read post]