Search for: "Lohan v. Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc." Results 1 - 16 of 16
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31 Mar 2018, 7:48 am by Eric Goldman
Case citation: Lohan v Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc., 2018 NY Slip Op 02208, 2018 WL 1524714 (N.Y. [read post]
29 Aug 2014, 11:16 am
Readers of this blog may remember that last July Lindsay Lohan sued Take-Two Interactive Software Inc. and Rockstar Games,  the makers of the video game Grand Theft Auto V (GTAV). [read post]
3 Jan 2018, 5:10 am by Eugene Volokh
Lohan and Gravano sued the game company (Take Two Interactive Software), claiming that this violated what is generally called their "right of publicity" (but "right of privacy" in New York). [read post]
19 Apr 2018, 7:58 am by Susan Ross (US)
Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. et al., Nos. 23 & 24 (N.Y. [read post]
19 Apr 2018, 7:58 am by Susan Ross (US)
Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. et al., Nos. 23 & 24 (N.Y. [read post]
1 Sep 2016, 2:57 pm by Eugene Volokh
Take Two Interactive Software, Inc., Lindsay Lohan and “Mob Wives” star Karen Gravano lost a lawsuit in which they claimed that Grand Theft Auto V had misappropriated their images. [read post]
1 Sep 2014, 7:04 am
Ms Lohan sued Take-Two Interactive Software Inc. and Rockstar Games, the makers of the video game Grand Theft Auto V (GTAV). [read post]
6 Oct 2021, 1:08 pm by Rebecca Tushnet
Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc., 97 N.E.3d 389 (N.Y. 2018). [read post]
2 Jan 2017, 11:27 am by Eric Goldman
Denying an injunction based on hot news against the republication of chess moves. * Gravano v Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc., 2016 NY Slip Op 05942 (N.Y. [read post]
15 Dec 2014, 7:25 am
Moving to Latin America, the floor was taken by Barbarita Guzmán, who focused on interaction between trade marks and copyright -- also considering the ‘moral rights’ issue in Bolivia, Colombia, Peru, and Ecuador. [read post]
20 Jan 2015, 12:00 am
The 1986 film chronicled two fictional cabaret performers who imitated the famous dance duo Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire, and Rogers argued that the use of her name in the movie title violated Section 43(a) of the Lanham by creating a false impression that she was involved in its production.The court disagreed, explaining that the expressive elements of book and movie titles are afforded more protection under the Lanham Act. [28] Naming the film “Ginger and Fred” was not… [read post]