Search for: "New York Times Co. v. Sullivan" Results 141 - 160 of 301
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12 Nov 2014, 12:31 pm by Media Law Prof
Cass, Center for the Rule of Law, Cass & Associates, PC; Boston University School of Law, is publishing Weighing Constitutional Anchors: New York Times Co. v. [read post]
31 Oct 2014, 5:00 am by Stephen Wermiel
Brennan’s Fight to Preserve the Legacy of New York Times v, Sullivan, sometimes the Justices simply could not decide a case, and the outcome flipped within the Court. [read post]
As summarized above, combined commercial and noncommercial speech that “communicates information, expresses opinion, recites grievances, protests claimed abuses, or solicits financial support on behalf of a movement whose existence and objectives are matters of public concern, [] is not purely commercial” and is afforded full First Amendment protection. [15]  In City of New York v. [read post]
25 Sep 2014, 6:57 am
The statute also allows punishment for false statements on matters of public concern, even without a showing of “actual malice” in the sense set forth by New York Times Co. v. [read post]
24 Jul 2014, 7:35 pm
" In papers, plaintiff theorizes that the previous cases mentioned are examples of an "extraordinarily speech-protective law" emerging from the Supreme Court's decision in New York Times Co. v Sullivan. [read post]
19 Jul 2014, 7:35 pm
" In papers, plaintiff theorizes that the previous cases mentioned are examples of an "extraordinarily speech-protective law" emerging from the Supreme Court's decision in New York Times Co. v Sullivan. [read post]
27 May 2014, 5:54 pm
Glenn Greenwald has a new book out about Edward Snowden, and Michael Kinsley has a review of it in the New York Times. [read post]
1 May 2014, 9:01 pm by John Dean
What is very noticeable about Ohio’s political false statement statute is that it embraces and requires a standard of falsity that parallels the Constitutional standard set forth in New York Times v. [read post]
19 Mar 2014, 2:35 pm by David Cosgrove
Indeed, Supreme Court Justice Stewart once wrote that the tort of defamation “reflects no more than our basic concept of the essential dignity and worth of every human being.1”Defamation law has been somewhat static since the seminal Supreme Court case of New York Times Co. v. [read post]