Search for: "Paul Ohm" Results 21 - 40 of 227
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21 Nov 2016, 11:15 am by Orin Kerr
Nosal Paul Ohm and Blake Reid, Regulating Software When Everything Has Software Ric Simmons, The Failure of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act: Time to Take an Administrative Approach to Regulating Computer Crime [read post]
30 Sep 2016, 2:00 am by vhunt
American University Washington College of LawPaul Ohm, Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center, presents today. [read post]
16 May 2016, 2:03 pm by Tanya Forsheit
., Paul Ohm, Broken Promises of Privacy: Responding to the Surprising Failure of Anonymization, 57 UCLA Law Review 1701 (2010). [read post]
25 Feb 2016, 9:47 am by HL Chronicle of Data Protection
FTC Regulation: Privacy and Security During her fireside chat with Georgetown University Law professor Paul Ohm, Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Chairwoman Edith Ramirez stated that data security is “one of the most significant challenges” society faces. [read post]
6 Feb 2016, 6:29 am by Robert Chesney
Location: Sheffield-Massey Room (Townes Hall 2.111), UT School of Law 9:00am - 9:30am         Welcome and breakfast: Introduction by Judge James Baker 9:30am - 10:30am       SESSION 1: Cyber in the Intelligence/Surveillance Context Bill Banks (Syracuse) Jen Daskal (American) 10:45am - 11:45am     SESSION 2: Cyber in the Criminal Law Context Paul Ohm (Georgetown) Jennifer Granick (Stanford) Richard Downing (Justice Department) Sean… [read post]
5 Feb 2016, 6:05 am by Robert Chesney
Today, the Strauss Center at the University of Texas-Austin hosts a unique and timely conference focused on the legal and policy dimensions of cybersecurity, which you can watch live here:  Below is the agenda for the event:  FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2016 Location: Sheffield-Massey Room (Townes Hall 2.111), UT School of Law 8:00am - 8:30am         Welcome and breakfast 8:30am - 9:45am         SESSION 1: The "Going Dark" Encryption Debate… [read post]
1 Feb 2016, 8:44 am by Eric Goldman
Photo credit: “the words Top 10 in a burst of colorful stars” // ShutterStockI’m pleased to present my annual list of top Internet Law developments from the past year. [read post]
12 Jan 2016, 3:27 pm by Robert Chesney
Now, the full agenda for the event (note that there is a registration requirement): FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2016 Location: Sheffield-Massey Room (Townes Hall 2.111), UT School of Law 8:00am - 8:30am         Welcome and breakfast 8:30am - 9:45am         SESSION 1: The "Going Dark" Encryption Debate Paul Ohm (Georgetown) Benjamin Wittes (Brookings) Riana Pfefferkorn (Stanford) Christopher Soghoian (ACLU) Moderator: Richard Downing (DOJ)… [read post]
29 Sep 2015, 4:28 am by Benjamin Wittes
Paul Ohm, Professor of Law and Faculty Director of the Center on Privacy and Technology, Georgetown University Law Center, moderated the panel. [read post]
12 Jun 2015, 3:30 am by Paul Ohm
Paul Ohm Thank you to the Jotwell editors for indulging me as I stretch their mission statement (and quite possibly their patience) by highlighting not an article nor even a conventional work of scholarship but rather a piece of software as the “thing I like (lots)”: mitmproxy, a tool created by Aldo Cortesi who shares authorship credit with Maximilian Hils and a larger “mitmproxy community. [read post]
17 May 2015, 10:13 am by Michelle N. Meyer
Thanks to Paul Ohm and conference co-sponsor Ryan Calo for inviting me to participate, to the editors of the Colorado Technology Law Journal, and to James Grimmelmann for being a worthy interlocutor over the past almost-year and for generously unfailingly tweeting my work on Facebook despite our sometimes divergent perspectives. [read post]
18 Mar 2015, 3:30 am by Frank Pasquale
Frank Pasquale Recently, Scott Peppet, Dan Solove, and Paul Ohm appeared in a great Al Jazeera comic on big data and privacy, called “Terms of Service. [read post]
6 Feb 2015, 6:00 am by Bridget Crawford
Washington Jennifer Camero ProfessorCamero Southern Illinois Montre Carodine MDCarodine Alabama Paul Caron SoCalTaxProf Pepperdine Michael  Carrier  profmikecarrier  Rutgers Arturo Carrillo AJCarrillo4 George Washington Elizabeth Carter BitsyNOLA Louisiana State Melissa  Casan MsCastan Monash David Case dwcase Mississippi Mary Anne Case Mary_Anne_Case Chicago Tim Caulfield CaulfieldTim Alberta James  Cavallaro  JimCavallaro  Stanford Eric Chaffee… [read post]
23 Jan 2015, 4:44 am by Bridget Crawford
Hatcher PovertyLawProf Baltimore Paul Heald pauljheald Illinois Gina Heathcote gina_heathcote SOAS, U [read post]
6 Jan 2015, 6:46 pm by Bridget Crawford
Thomas Anthony Niedwiecki LawProfAnt John Marshall (Chicago) Sean Nolon snolon Vermont Tracy Norton millennialprof Touro Tracy Norton profnorton Touro Beth Simone Noveck bethnoveck NYLS Rory O'Connell rjjoconnell Queens University Belfast Shuyi Oei ShuyiOei Tulane Paul Ohm paulohm Colorado David Opderbeck dopderbeck Seton Hall Lisa Ouellette PatentScholar Stanford Kevin Outterson koutterson Boston University Jessica Owley JessicaOwley Buffalo Frank Pasquale FrankPasquale Seton… [read post]
24 Oct 2014, 1:23 pm by Kurt Wimmer
, University of Colorado’s Paul Ohm, always insightful, has focused his considerable intellect on the topic of sensitive data. [read post]
18 Sep 2014, 7:32 am by Michelle N. Meyer
Other participants include law profs Paul Ohm, Ryan Calo, and James Grimmelman, Princeton Center for Internet Technology Policy Director Edward Felten, FTC Commissioner Julie Brill, and UT-Austin psychologist Tal Yarkoni. [read post]
14 Jul 2014, 3:44 pm by Sabrina I. Pacifici
 July 9, 2014 “Paul Ohm’s 2009 article Broken Promises of Privacy spurred a debate in legal and policy circles on the appropriate response to computer science research on re-identification techniques. [read post]
9 Jul 2014, 4:27 am by Arvind Narayanan
Paul Ohm’s 2009 article Broken Promises of Privacy spurred a debate in legal and policy circles on the appropriate response to computer science research on re-identification techniques. [read post]
18 Jun 2014, 9:30 pm by Abigail Slater
However, there are others, such as Professor Paul Ohm, who argue that “nonmonetary harm abounds online” and that regulators ought to be able to address those harms – even if they are more subjective in nature – provided that the harms are non-trivial. [read post]