Search for: "People v. Griffin" Results 341 - 360 of 402
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10 May 2010, 2:59 am
  People increasingly demand food in its natural form to nourish their bodies down to the cellular level. [read post]
7 Apr 2010, 8:51 am
In December of 2009, the Florida Court of Appeals concluded in Robertson v. [read post]
5 Mar 2010, 1:04 pm by Michael Heise
Torts folks might be interested in a recent paper by Griffin Sims Edwards (Emory, Econ), Doing Their Duty: An Empirical Analysis of the Unintended Effect of Tarasoff v Regents on Homicidal Activity. [read post]
4 Mar 2010, 3:19 am by Adam Kolber
This piece, recently posted to SSRN, suggests that the obligations to disclose under the Tarasoff case caused an increase in homicide (presumably by disincentivizing treatment of the most at-risk patients): "Doing Their Duty: An Empirical Analysis of the Unintended Effect of Tarasoff v Regents on Homicidal Activity"  GRIFFIN SIMS EDWARDS, Emory University, Department of EconomicsThe effect of state duty to warn laws inspired by Tarasoff v Regents has been… [read post]
9 Feb 2010, 1:02 pm by Erin Miller
Indeed, three years after Jones, in Griffin v. [read post]
13 Jan 2010, 5:00 pm by Michael Ginsborg
A trial on constitutional rights should be accessible to as many people as possible,” said Chad Griffin, Board President of the American Foundation for Equal Rights. [read post]
10 Oct 2009, 5:55 am
Disproportionate Number of Outbreaks due to Raw Milk Consumption: Only ~1% of people drink raw milk in the United States, yet raw dairy products cause over 50% of the milkborne outbreaks W [read post]
22 Sep 2009, 1:25 pm
Justice Scalia's comments came in the 2006 Supreme Court ruling Kansas v. [read post]
15 Aug 2009, 2:25 am
In a states' rights oriented decision, United States v. [read post]
19 Jul 2009, 2:07 pm
For example, the intention behind the equal protection clause might be formulated at a relatively high level of generality--leading to the conclusion that segregation is unconstitutional--or at a very particular level--in which case the fact that the Reconstruction Congress segregated the District of Columbia schools might be thought to support the "separate but equal" principle of Plessy v. [read post]