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21 Mar 2017, 2:04 pm by Molly Runkle
Cox for Medium, Brady Zadrozny for The Daily Beast, Rick Pildes for Balkinization, Corey Brettschneider for The New York Times, Paul Kane for The Washington Post, Paul Callan of CNN,  Emily Crockett of Vox, as well as Sean Illing, Steven Ertelt of LifeNews, and Ian Millhiser of ThinkProgress. [read post]
2 Mar 2017, 4:13 am by Edith Roberts
” A contrary view comes from Richard Pildes, also at the Election Law Blog, who considers “today’s decision a major new precedent with broad implications, not just for racial gerrymandering issues, but for partisan gerrymandering ones potentially as well. [read post]
1 Mar 2017, 9:15 pm by Walter Olson
” Two more views: Rick Hasen, Richard Pildes. [read post]
26 Feb 2017, 5:20 pm
"When Politics Becomes Existential": Today at the "Election Law Blog," Richard Pildes has a post that begins, "Judge Laurence H. [read post]
3 Jun 2016, 9:30 pm by Dan Ernst
Update: Randy Barnett, Richard Epstein, David Post and Ilya Somin in Adam Liptak's article in this morning's New York Times on Trump's Threat to the Rule of Law. [read post]
14 Jan 2016, 7:12 am by Amy Howe
Lyle Denniston covered the oral argument for this blog, with other coverage coming from Jess Bravin of The Wall Street Journal; commentary on the issues involved in the case comes from Rick Pildes at Balkinization. [read post]
6 Jan 2016, 5:58 am by Amy Howe
Also at Balkinization, Rick Pildes weighs in on the federal government’s amicus brief in Puerto Rico v. [read post]
9 Oct 2015, 4:39 am by Amy Howe
” At the Fed Soc Blog, Richard Pildes previews Puerto Rico v. [read post]
2 Jul 2015, 12:27 pm by NCC Staff
Richard Pildes is the Sudler Family Professor of Constitutional Law at the New York University School of Law. [read post]
30 Jun 2015, 7:37 am
There is no easy answer, and that conundrum is what produced a legitimate 5-to-4 divide," writes lawprof Richard Pildes in a NYT op-ed about the opinion in Arizona State Legislature v. [read post]
4 Jun 2015, 6:55 pm by NCC Staff
Richard Pildes is the Sudler Family Professor of Constitutional Law at the New York University School of Law. [read post]
4 Apr 2015, 1:13 pm by Sandy Levinson
  Like Rick Pildes (himself borrowing from earlier political scientists), Aldrich also emphasizes the collapse of the schizoid Democratic Party following the Voting Rights Act of 1965, when the “big tent” of Northern liberals and Southern white racists disappeared, with many of the latter, of course, migrating to the Republican Party in the aftermath of Barry Goldwater’s vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and, more importantly, Richard… [read post]
27 Jan 2015, 7:56 pm by Margaret Spicer
Dahm, Konstantin Kakaes, Samuel Issacharoff, Richard Pildes, and Brad Allenby. [read post]
13 Jan 2015, 4:47 am by Gustavo Arballo
But they do not depend on an understanding of what interpretation necessarily requires.How Behavioral Economics Trims Its Sails and Why (Ryan Bubb & Richard H. [read post]
12 Nov 2014, 2:05 pm by Richard Hasen
” Professor Richard Pildes, one of the attorneys arguing for the plaintiffs, pushed back effectively on the notion that the attorney general would have required the state to maintain the same percentage of majority-minority districts in order to get Justice Department approval for a redistricting plan. [read post]
30 Oct 2014, 12:02 pm by Richard Hasen
Those plaintiffs are represented by noted voting rights professor Richard Pildes, among others.) [read post]
21 Nov 2013, 10:46 am by Benjamin Wittes
” The other panelsts included: Daniel Klaidman, Newsweek/Daily Beast Mark Mazzetti,  The New York Times Ellen Nakashima, The Washington Post Professor Richard Pildes, NYU School of Law [read post]
6 Oct 2013, 9:01 pm by Michael C. Dorf
  As law professors Daryl Levinson and Richard Pildes argued in an important 2006 Harvard Law Review article, during periods of unified government—when one party controls both houses of Congress and the Presidency—our system works very much like a parliamentary one, with the President finding support for his agenda in the legislature, while in times of divided government, separation of powers works all too well, for then a determined opposition can create gridlock.… [read post]