Search for: "Stephen Gillers" Results 21 - 40 of 220
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28 Dec 2012, 3:48 pm by Andrew Perlman
A couple of years ago, Stephen Gillers asked whether the duty of confidentiality prohibits a lawyer from responding to a former client's public criticisms. [read post]
19 Aug 2013, 9:34 am by Andrew Perlman
Stephen Gillers previously noted the publication of Ben Trachtenberg's article, Law School Marketing and Legal Ethics. [read post]
27 Jan 2015, 6:56 am by John Steele
Our own Stephen Gillers offers thoughts, including discussion of legal ethics issues, at The Nation. [read post]
31 Oct 2013, 5:34 pm by John Steele
The Wall Street Journal has this post, quoting our own Monroe Freedman, Stephen Gillers and LEF alum Anita Bernstein. [read post]
19 Mar 2013, 12:44 am by John Steele
Court" The article quotes our own Stephen Gillers. [read post]
11 Mar 2013, 4:03 am by Paul Caron
I am one of the 67 law professors and deans who, as members of the "Coalition of Concerned Colleagues" assembled by Paul Carrington, Stephen Gillers, Deborah Rhode, and others, sent the following letter to the ABA: The recent chorus of complaints about the “crisis” in legal education has brought new... [read post]
27 Apr 2011, 4:01 am by White Collar Crime Prof Blogger
Professor Stephen Gillers has a wonderful new piece in 63 Stanford Law Review 813 (April 2011), titled, Guns, Fruits, Drugs, and Documents: A Criminal Defense Lawyer's Responsibility for Real Evidence. [read post]
17 May 2011, 9:52 pm by Legal Profession
Posted by Alan Childress The one on-topic features NYU's Stephen Gillers' new article on the professional responsibility of lawyers who hold or come across real evidence in a case, such as guns, presidential tapes, and drugs. [read post]
9 Oct 2010, 12:45 pm by Renee Newman Knake
  LEF contributors Stephen Gillers and Steven Lubet along with Deborah Rhode offer their thoughts in a NYT article that appeared on the front page today, available here. [read post]
8 Nov 2008, 5:26 pm
  This story describes the provisions and includes extensive quotes from ethics experts Stephen Gillers and Nancy Moore. [read post]
6 Sep 2013, 5:30 am by Ernie Svenson
Stephen Gillers is a legal ethics expert, and the other day on his blog he asked “if pervasive use of social media may actually be harmful to some practices? [read post]
23 May 2010, 10:09 pm by lawmrh
New York University legal ethics professor Stephen Gillers was quoted in Sunday’s NYTimes Op-Ed, Résumés Made for Fibbing by John Schwartz. [read post]
4 Oct 2011, 8:02 am by Walter Olson
Ethicist Stephen Gillers calls the ruling a “must read for the legal ethics crowd with jaw dropping allegations“. [read post]
27 Mar 2011, 5:17 pm by Franco Tarulli
Stephen Gillers at Legal Ethics Forum posted a very interesting note about an excerpt from a talk that United States Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito gave concerning the citation of philosophy in legal journals. [read post]
4 Sep 2020, 7:00 am by zbrown
” On Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host Craig Williams is joined by Stephen Gillers, a professor of law at NYU School, and attorney Charles Glasser, an expert in international media law, as they discuss this alleged dossier, it’s implications for freedom of the press, and the current and historic relationships between the White House and journalists. [read post]
12 Apr 2008, 3:21 pm by Jack Balkin
Over at The Nation , Stephen Gillers argues that the Yoo-Bybee torture memos violated canons of professional ethics , in part because Yoo and Bybee were confused about who their client was: How could two really smart guys authorize torture using "one-sided legal arguments" that have "no foundation" in law? [read post]
12 Apr 2008, 3:21 pm
Over at The Nation, Stephen Gillers argues that the Yoo-Bybee torture memos violated canons of professional ethics, in part because Yoo and Bybee were confused about who their client was: How could two really smart guys authorize torture using "one-sided legal arguments" that have "no foundation" in law? [read post]
19 May 2010, 8:32 am by John Steele
A judge's comments about "purging" documents in the Limewire case leads to a discussion of the ethics of advising clients about document retention (in which I'm quoted), and a scandal about an expert who often gives testimony inimical to gay adoption rights leads to a discussion about correcting the record (in which Stephen Gillers is quoted). [read post]