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3 Apr 2012, 1:00 pm by Benjamin Wittes
 I understand that the Harvard National Security Journal is a co-host for this talk, and I thank the Journal as well for this opportunity. [read post]
12 Mar 2012, 8:13 am by Ronald Collins
Cardozo, What Medicine Can Do for Law (1930) William O. [read post]
3 Feb 2012, 1:52 am
Since both the United States and India are federations, invariably the Superior Courts in those jurisdictions are called on to decide when there appears to be any conflict between state and federal legislation or a question of legislative competence arises. [read post]
10 Jan 2012, 3:30 pm by Benjamin Wittes
 My team is the United States armed forces. [read post]
2 Jan 2012, 4:00 am by Terry Hart
Yet arguments of a conflict between copyright law and the First Amendment in the United States are relatively new — understanding why the two co-existed for nearly two centuries before these arguments began to appear should prove valuable to current scholarship. [read post]
15 Dec 2011, 12:22 am by Kevin LaCroix
 However, last year, in an abrupt reversal, the United States Supreme Court dramatically limited the extraterritorial application of U.S. securities laws in Morrison v. [read post]
13 Dec 2011, 7:25 am by Kevin Russell
United States Army Corps of Engineers, 543 F.3d 586, 594 (9th Cir. 2008)). [read post]
1 Dec 2011, 4:30 pm by Benjamin Wittes
 In addition to being strong and thoughtful statements of United States policy, these two speeches provide the framework within which my observations here can be better understood. [read post]
26 Oct 2011, 3:00 am by Ted Folkman
So far as enforcement is concerned, it can safely be said that a valid foreign nation decree that orders the payment of money will usually be enforced in the United States. [read post]
17 Oct 2011, 4:00 am by Terry Hart
Copyright protection in the United States was first championed by a group of authors, including Noah Webster and Joel Barlow.10 In response, a committee in the Continental Congress — consisting of James Madison, Hugh Williamson, and Ralph Izard — drafted a resolution that recommended the states pass their own copyright laws.11 Twelve of the thirteen states had passed such legislation by 1786. [read post]
17 Sep 2011, 11:39 pm by David Kopel
However, if you might use the textbook next semester, and would like to see some chapters, just contact any of the co-authors, and we can mail them to you.The 11 chapters of the printed textbook proceed chronologically, from ancient Rome, Greece, and China, all the way to the post–Heller cases. [read post]
18 Aug 2011, 11:10 pm by Christa Culver
Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton, LLPDocket: 10-1339Issue(s): Whether under the implied preemption principles in Buckman Co. v. [read post]