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28 May 2019, 2:00 am by DONALD SCARINCI
Facts of Herrera v Wyoming An 1868 treaty between the United States and the Crow Tribe promised that in exchange for most of the Tribe’s territory in modern-day Montana and Wyoming, its members would “have the right to hunt on the unoccupied lands of the United States so long as game may be found thereon . . . and peace subsists . . . on the borders of the hunting districts. [read post]
11 Oct 2017, 5:08 am by Matthew L.M. Fletcher
Here: 2017-10-05 Herrera Cert Petition Question presented: Whether Wyoming’s admission to the Union or the establishment of the Bighorn National Forest abrogated the Crow Tribe of Indians’ 1868 federal treaty right to hunt on the “unoccupied lands of the United States,” thereby permitting the present-day criminal conviction of a Crow member who engaged in subsistence hunting for his family. [read post]
10 Nov 2017, 5:41 am by Matthew L.M. Fletcher
2017-10-05 Herrera Cert Petition Question presented: Whether Wyoming’s admission to the Union or the establishment of the Bighorn National Forest abrogated the Crow Tribe of Indians’ 1868 federal treaty right to hunt on the “unoccupied lands of the United States,” thereby permitting the present-day criminal conviction of a Crow member who engaged in subsistence hunting for his family. [read post]
18 Jan 2019, 10:08 am by Guest Blogger
 And indeed, both Herrera and the United States (as amicus) have urged the Court to do just that: put Race Horse out to pasture once and for all.The Court is now left with three options (assuming that no ancillary issues derail a merits determination). [read post]
30 Oct 2019, 12:01 pm by Attorney Author
The United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida dismissed the case on summary judgment, finding that Ms. [read post]
2 Jan 2019, 11:18 am by Gregory Ablavsky
In this case, the validity of Herrera’s state-law conviction turns on the continued force of the 1868 Second Treaty of Fort Laramie between the Crow Tribe and the United States, which guaranteed the tribe “the right to hunt on the unoccupied lands of the United States so long as game may be found thereon. [read post]