Search for: "Vikram David Amar and Jason Mazzone" Results 1 - 20 of 44
Sorted by Relevance | Sort by Date
RSS Subscribe: 20 results | 100 results
19 May 2022, 8:40 am by Howard Bashman
“Ten Thoughts on Illinois’s Unique Process for Filling State Supreme Court Vacancies”: Law professors Vikram David Amar and Jason Mazzone have this essay online at Justia’s Verdict. [read post]
16 Jul 2021, 8:00 am by Howard Bashman
“New Texas Abortion Statute Raises Cutting-Edge Questions Not Just About Abortion but About the Relationship Between State and Federal Courts”: Law professors Vikram David Amar and Jason Mazzone have this essay online at Justia’s Verdict. [read post]
18 May 2022, 9:01 pm by Vikram David Amar and Jason Mazzone
Last week a good friend of the law school where both of us teach (the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Illinois Supreme Court Justice Rita Garman, announced she was stepping down effective July 7, 2022. [read post]
21 Jun 2021, 9:01 pm by Vikram David Amar and Jason Mazzone
Two weeks ago the Republican Minority Leaders in both Houses of the Illinois legislature (known as the General Assembly), in their official capacity and as individual registered voters, brought suit in federal district court in McConchie v. [read post]
21 Feb 2019, 9:01 pm by Vikram David Amar and Jason Mazzone
In our last column, we explored some threshold justiciability issues (focusing on the plaintiff’s standing to sue in federal court) in the recent federal lawsuit by a Texas-based nonprofit organization—Faculty, Alumni, and Students Opposed to Racial Preferences (FASORP)—against Harvard Law Review (HLR), challenging HLR’s use of race and gender in selecting members and also in selecting authors for publication. [read post]
14 Sep 2022, 9:01 pm by Vikram David Amar and Jason Mazzone
One of us, Mazzone, has been on the Illinois hiring committee a number of times in the last decade. [read post]
18 Oct 2018, 9:01 pm by Vikram David Amar and Jason Mazzone
Follow @prof_amar Vikram David Amar is the Iwan Foundation Professor of Law and the Dean at the University of Illinois College of Law. [read post]
9 Jan 2020, 9:01 pm by Vikram David Amar and Jason Mazzone
Freeing senators from party-leader retribution would be nice, but there is simply no way to do that without freeing senators from accountability to the people of the states (who themselves may prefer to be as intensely partisan as their leaders are in today’s moment), which is the whole point of popular election of senators.Follow @prof_amar Vikram David Amar is the Dean and Iwan Foundation Professor of Law at the University of… [read post]
19 May 2019, 9:01 pm by Vikram David Amar and Jason Mazzone
From the Right and from the Left, legislatures are considering—and in many cases enacting—laws that have no meaningful chance of surviving judicial challenge under the U.S. [read post]
14 Jul 2021, 9:01 pm by Vikram David Amar and Jason Mazzone
Last month, Texas adopted an anti-abortion statute that is noteworthy not so much for how it tries to deter abortions but for how it tries to deter legal challenges to the statute itself. [read post]
31 Oct 2018, 9:01 pm by Vikram David Amar and Jason Mazzone
This three-part series looks at intriguing constitutional questions raised by California’s statutory enactment of SB 826, which requires publicly held corporations with principal executive offices located in California to have a prescribed number of women on their boards of directors. [read post]
1 Dec 2019, 9:01 pm by Vikram David Amar and Jason Mazzone
As we explained in a column a few weeks ago, Part One in a series, an important federal lawsuit challenging Mississippi’s scheme for electing governors is wending its way through the federal courts. [read post]
11 Sep 2022, 9:01 pm by Vikram David Amar and Jason Mazzone
The past term at the Supreme Court will certainly be known for the Dobbs decision overruling Roe v. [read post]
28 Apr 2022, 9:01 pm by Vikram David Amar and Jason Mazzone
Perhaps this could make the TJ case more like the Harvard dispute, which one of us (Amar) has argued could rightly be understood not necessarily as highlighting a problem with affirmative action generally, but instead with affirmative action plans that seek to burden Asians more than Whites. [read post]