Search for: "Wells v. Dickens" Results 1 - 20 of 75
Sorted by Relevance | Sort by Date
RSS Subscribe: 20 results | 100 results
13 Apr 2015, 10:10 am by Scott Plamondon
Barry as well as the circumstances in which each person’s image is used. [read post]
24 Dec 2013, 10:29 am by Joe Patrice
Well, he filed a case against the Dominican Republic for “bad weather. [read post]
29 Jun 2011, 1:50 pm by Barry Barnett
You know things probably won't turn out well when the first sentence in a 5-4 U.S. [read post]
29 Mar 2016, 12:30 pm
Not too many Irish Trade Mark cases hit the Irish Courts and when they do, the in-depth analysis which the author provides to the leading cases in areas such as passing off (McCambridge v Joseph Brennan Bakeries), genuine use (Compagnie Gervais Danone v Glanbia Foods Society Ltd) and comparative advertising (Aldi Stores (Ireland) Ltd. v Dunnes Stores) is for the practitioner and students alike transcending differing needs. [read post]
5 Dec 2013, 9:09 am by Brian Hall
” Almost made me think of Dickens’ “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…” (OK, maybe not quite.) [read post]
29 Aug 2013, 7:55 am by Daniel E. Cummins
  Charles Dickens fromOliver Twist  In his recent August 27, 2013 decision, in the case of White v. [read post]
29 Aug 2013, 7:55 am by Daniel E. Cummins
  Charles Dickens fromOliver Twist  In his recent August 27, 2013 decision, in the case of White v. [read post]
28 Jan 2013, 10:08 am
It was in his opening statements that he confessed that, while it is a common misconception that he was the first to use the criterion of coolness as a grounds of differentiation in the well known Apple v Samsung judgment of 9 July 2012 (noted by the IPKat here), it simply isn’t true. [read post]
12 May 2014, 4:20 am by Terry Hart
On Friday, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit released its decision in Oracle America Inc. v. [read post]
16 Mar 2015, 2:48 pm by Steve Gardner
by Steve Gardner On Friday the 13th, the Ninth Circuit issued an opinion roundly rejecting almost every defense food companies use to try to avoid getting to the truth of the matter, in Reid v. [read post]